JavaScript DHTML Menu Powered by Milonic
CODAR Ocean Sensors logo
CODAR Ocean Sensors - The Leaders in HF Radar Technology      
News Article Archives

Past Events
Newsletter Archives


For a Printable PDF Version of this article
Click here to >> Download Document << (approx. 260k)


August 2011


Storm Chasing:
Taiwan SeaSonde Network Typhoon Observations


Routine measurement of the powerful Kuroshio western boundary current isn’t exciting enough, the Long-Range SeaSonde network operating along Taiwan’s east coast occasionally captures the effects of powerful typhoons migrating through the Pacific.


Track of center of Typhoon Fanapi

Above: Track of center of Typhoon Fanapi.
Courtesy of Center Weather Bureau.

In the Autumn of 2010 these three radars, which are part of a larger SeaSonde network established by the Taiwan Ocean Research Institute (TORI), measured the effects of Typhoon Fanapi on the ocean surface currents, as well as measuring the impact this event had upon waves in the area. These results were presented at the 5th Radiowave Operator’s Working Group (ROWG-5) meeting in Santa Barbara, California this past April 2011.

Significant waveheight produced by the northernmost of the Long-Range SeaSondes (HOPE) during Typhoon Fanapi passage

Significant waveheight produced by the northernmost
of the Long-Range SeaSondes (HOPE) during
Typhoon Fanapi passage. Each of the three plots
are wave measurements from
a different range cell.
The maximum wave height is about 15m.


TORI, established in 2008, is part of the National Applied Research Laboratories, supported by the National Science Council of Taiwan. The HF radar program was initiated nearly immediately upon TORI establishment and is one of the organization’s initial foci. Phase 1 of the TORI radar program calls for 16 SeaSondes, with
TORI SeaSonde in Taiwan
TORI SeaSonde in Taiwan

10 of those already in place.

The data from this network will be provided to various organizations for research and application use, especially for search and rescue.

Below: Offshore vectors are surface currents measured by three Long-Range SeaSondes on Taiwan’s east coast. Each radar location is represented by a red star (HOPE, LUYE & SHIA). The green line is the typhoon eye track. The location center of typhoon (seen in satellite data) and the ocean vortex shown in the CODAR data match well, with currents having been affected by the strong typhoon winds. For further information contact CODAR local sales and technical services partner based in Taipei, Taiwan, Mr. Alan Chuang of Sino Instruments Co. Ltd.,
e-mail: sinoalan@ms1.hinet.net



Offshore vectors are surface currents measured by three Long-Range SeaSondes on Taiwan’s east coast




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          




 

© CODAR Ocean Sensors 2000 - 2017
 
About CODAR | Intro to HF Radar | News | Products | Support | Contact Us | Help | Partners Sales Support